Minister Lisa Hanna has the portfolio Culture, Youth and Sport. She is a former Miss World 1993 with a background in broadcasting. She will celebrate her 37th birthday soon, which makes her one of the youngest women appointed to parliament. She appears to have a history of voluntarism and engagement with the United Nations and possesses a Master’s degree. She was appointed to this post by President Portia Simpson Miller when the PNP won the December 2011 election. She previously was elected in 2007 as well. All this to say, Minister Hanna seems to be a capable, intelligent individual, but you wouldn’t know it from the way everyone is complaining about her lately. Whether it is her lack of availability to youth groups, or what people are perceiving as the botched Jubilee celebrations (Jamaica will celebrate 50 years of independence next month), to a roundly dismissed official song, nobody is happy with the minister’s performance. This includes a Canadian politician who complained both to me and her office that she is completely unresponsive to anyone reaching out to her office. I would concur with this. I met Minister Hanna at an event, and while she was perfectly nice and welcoming, the only way I know she still exists is that she continues to make headlines. I called and emailed her office so many times with not even a response from an assistant that I have since given up. I don’t know enough yet about Jamaican politics to offer a theory as to why her office is so inaccessible. But clearly perception is becoming reality if you are making the front page of the newspaper like this. There is a larger point here, other than complaining about a politician. Jamaica’s 50th anniversary is coming up very shortly, and there has yet to be a coherent vision as to what the theme is, what Jamaican people should celebrate, what they should rally around, or even the basics, like what events will occur. Many people are saying that this is a lost opportunity to rally the country around such an event. It is a lost opportunity to unify and raise morale and motivation, they say. Hopefully, this won’t be the case and officials can pull something together in time. Regardless, Jamaicans know how to have an amazing party no matter the conditions, so that will not be a problem.

Minister Lisa Hanna has the portfolio Culture, Youth and Sport. She is a former Miss World 1993 with a background in broadcasting. She will celebrate her 37th birthday soon, which makes her one of the youngest women appointed to parliament. She appears to have a history of voluntarism and engagement with the United Nations and possesses a Master’s degree. She was appointed to this post by President Portia Simpson Miller when the PNP won the December 2011 election. She previously was elected in 2007 as well. All this to say, Minister Hanna seems to be a capable, intelligent individual, but you wouldn’t know it from the way everyone is complaining about her lately. Whether it is her lack of availability to youth groups, or what people are perceiving as the botched Jubilee celebrations (Jamaica will celebrate 50 years of independence next month), to a roundly dismissed official song, nobody is happy with the minister’s performance. This includes a Canadian politician who complained both to me and her office that she is completely unresponsive to anyone reaching out to her office. I would concur with this. I met Minister Hanna at an event, and while she was perfectly nice and welcoming, the only way I know she still exists is that she continues to make headlines. I called and emailed her office so many times with not even a response from an assistant that I have since given up. I don’t know enough yet about Jamaican politics to offer a theory as to why her office is so inaccessible. But clearly perception is becoming reality if you are making the front page of the newspaper like this. There is a larger point here, other than complaining about a politician. Jamaica’s 50th anniversary is coming up very shortly, and there has yet to be a coherent vision as to what the theme is, what Jamaican people should celebrate, what they should rally around, or even the basics, like what events will occur. Many people are saying that this is a lost opportunity to rally the country around such an event. It is a lost opportunity to unify and raise morale and motivation, they say. Hopefully, this won’t be the case and officials can pull something together in time. Regardless, Jamaicans know how to have an amazing party no matter the conditions, so that will not be a problem.